Sunday, March 25, 2012

DOORS AND OPENINGS

Doors and Openings

I have been doing research on doors for a big project I am working on.  I have always thought that doors were special and significant.  They are something you walk through every day.  To start the day, we walk through our front door.  To go to work we open the door to the office.  When you enter church, you walk through a large set of doors.  It is a moment when you pause, anticipate, and can even get fearful.  Who knows what the day will bring? Who knows what is on the other side of the door?

So what do you want to pick for your home?  Yes, you can go to Home Depot and buy a hollow core door but do you want to walk through them everyday and feel hollow??  NO! You want a door that is exciting and beautiful, something full of promise for the future and also one that gives you a sense of  history.  OK, a home doesn't need to have all doors like this, but how about a fabulous front door?

I decided to go through some photos from my travels to see what amazing openings I have walked or looked through.  Wherever I am, I love taking pictures of a great doors.

Here is a picture of me at the Taj Mahal
A better picture of the Taj by Thamer Al-Tassan
Talk about exciting and historical.  The Taj Mahal is not just an amazing marble dome.  It is a series of substructures where you enter and exit through magnificent arches that are made of marble inlaid with semi precious stones.  You know the artists were hard at work to create such a large structure.  You feel their sweat (OK, it was about 110 degrees when I went!) and you see their determination to do everything perfect for the Mughal emperor.




This is a photo of me at the entrance to a temple in Bali

Bali has many doors to temples that you enter with respect and humility.  You may not enter if you are not properly covered, so you can see my skirt and sash that a local worshiper handed to me before visiting the temples.

The next several doors are from Udaipur, India.  I love the scalloped edge and the dark wood with brass.  The scallops make the doors special.  They are beckoning you and inviting you into see the splendor on the other side.


Udaipur, India

The painted door above depicts an Indian God, Ganesha.  The royal colors are used and immediately you are aware that you must be silent to show your reverence.  Below, another God is framed by the scalloped door.
India

India
From this opening, one peeks at the city life below.  I took the photo from inside a palace. In the past, one may have been hiding away from the city or anticipating the city's energy.  Below, I fell in love with the beauty!  The turquoise, the tile, the history of daily life hand painted in each tile.  So stunning!

India
In Istanbul, Turkey, I took many pictures of hand carved stone openings and while I was on a boat cruising the Bosphorus, I saw doors, windows and places of worship that were incredible.  I could have gone up and down all day long.

Turkey

Photo taken from a boat on the Bosphorus in Istanbul

So before going to Home Depot, think about your doors.  Embellish them, revere them, notice your feelings as you walk through them.  I think you may choose a different door:-)

xoxo,










3 comments :

  1. Dear Kathleen - Very excited to find your blog! I just added it to my blogroll. The photos from your trips are fabulous. Have you been to Morocco? Some amazing doors, windows, and gateways. BTW, love your pins on Pinterest. Cheers, Loi Thai (Washington, DC) - toneontoneantiques.blogspot.com

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  2. Kathleen - Thanks for your comment on my blog. When did you live in DC? I worked at the Smithsonian, on the mall, for over 5 years (starting in the late 1990's). I have friends at the National Gallery. What a small world. Let me know if you are back in DC!! :-)

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    1. So funny!! I was there in the early 90's! I worked in Adult Education dept. I know I had a very low GS level! Haha. My boss and immediate boss are still there. Some people never leave:) Hope to meet you in person! K

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I love your comments! Thank you for reading. Best, Kathleen